Beer Guide - Difference Between Ales and Lagers and Stouts – Boys'Co
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Beer Guide - Difference Between Ales and Lagers and Stouts

Posted: Sep 07 2016

ale beer beer types lager beer lager vs ale difference between ale and lager

 

If you're a beer enthusiast like us and have wondered the difference between ale and lager, you've come to the right place. In this quick article, we will be talking about ale beer, lager beer, stouts, and what makes these beer types different. 

 

Ales

 

ale beer beer types lager beer lager vs ale difference between ale and lager

 

Ales are the oldest type of beers that have been around for thousands of years. They are brewed with top-fermenting yeast in warmer temperatures compared to lagers which are brewed in colder temperatures. Top-fermenting yeast, just like it sounds, is a yeast which rises to the top of the beer as it brews. Due to the fact that Ale's are brewed with warmer temperatures, the final product often features a stronger taste with fruity aromas and other fermentation byproducts.

 

 

30% of all beers sold in Canada are Ales.

 

 

Lagers

 

ale beer beer types lager beer lager vs ale difference between ale and lager

 

The word Lager derives from the German word "lagern" which means to store, which is exactly what makes this beer different. In comparison to Ales which are fast brewed in warmer temperatures, Lagers can take up to a month or longer until they're fully brewed. This prolonged and cooler aging process stops the production of esters in the brew which would usually result in a more fruity flavour. This results in a much cleaner and crisper taste compared to Ale's. 

 

Lagers are estimated to account for 90% of all beers consumed around the globe. 

 

Stouts 

 

ale beer beer types lager beer lager vs ale difference between ale and lager stout

 

When people hear the word Stout in reference to beer, they usually think of a strong and dark beer. Although these are the attributes of many Stout beers, this is not always true. Stouts are technically still considered to be Ale's, however what makes them so unique is the heavily roasted grains used in the fermenting process. . 

 

 

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